Young people aged 16-24 have many options to choose from when starting their career, one of them taking on an apprenticeship.

But how do you engage with those undertaking apprenticeships to make sure they become a valuable long-term asset?

We take a look at the best ways both sides of an apprenticeship can benefit and how to manage the new workforce generation – the ‘Millennial’.

5 Ways To Take An Apprentice To The Next Level

  1. Long–term – It takes two to tango. Ensure plans are in place to monitor, manage and train your apprentice. If you support them they will undoubtedly support your business.
  2. Interview – Ask the right questions. Think about the person you want for the business, they will be someone who believes in your ethos, environment and product you offer.
  3. State of mind – Favour mind-set over skill-set. Many 16-24 year olds don’t have an incredible skill-set, but with a strong willingness to learn and work these can be taught over time and monitored.
  4. Think ahead – Put in place an apprenticeship program that suits the needs of the business and will continue to do so 6-12 months down the line. It won’t benefit your business if an apprentice is sitting a basic qualification but is working in an advanced environment.
  5. Patience – Try not to be too critical, an apprentice will pick things up on the way. Regularly meet up to check progress and provide support when necessary.

10 Ways To Effectively Manage Millennials In Your Workforce

Young people who are entering apprenticeships are categorised as the generation of ‘millennials’.

Born after 1990 and before 2000, they are the generation that are constantly connected and told they can achieve anything.

They have similar ethics and desire to succeed as the previous ‘Baby Boomer’ generation, but require different styles of management to get the best of them in a place of work.

There are several ways to get a millennial on your side, we’ve complied our top 10.

  1. StructureMillennials have grown up with modern structures to their lives. Due dates, set hours, schedules, set goals and assessing progress are all vital to retaining a base for their work.
  2. Leadership – They look up to you and want your feedback. They want to know the whole picture; if you invest time in them they’ll do the same back.
  3. Encourage – Millennials have access to the whole world at their fingertips. Actively encourage their ‘self-assured’ attitude.
  4. Teamwork – Gone are the days of everyone being a ‘lone-ranger’ in their careers, millennials enjoy being part of a team. Take advantage of this willingness to work together in groups for better success.
  5. Challenge – Boring is bad. Millennials seek ever-changing tasks and want to prove their skill set.
  6. Multi-task – Millennials aren’t fazed with multitasking, look at how many devices they can use at once! Eliminate boredom by clearly outlining several tasks and goals every week for them to undertake.
  7. Technology – This is a generation that will know more about technology than a top CEO, use it to your advantage! Millennials are incredibly comfortable in computer, mobile and electronic literacy so bear this in mind when setting tasks.
  8. Networking – They need to be shown loyalty. They will reciprocate in their efforts, but be aware they are constantly connected and have their CV online to keep their options open.
  9. Balance – Millennials aren’t into the idea of the 60-hour a week work slog. They’ll work hard for you as long as they are allowed a balance of friends, family and activities they love.
  10. Workplace – Create a balance between hard work and deserved reward! Millennials want to enjoy work and make friends, encourage this as long as their side of the bargain is kept.

Conclusion

Young people want success and with the right guidance can become incredibly valuable to your company.

If you’re taking on an apprentice consider the long-term benefits of the person and whether you can apply the aforementioned points to benefit their millennial outlook.

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