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Annie Hayes

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Skipping work is on the increase

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Skiving work is reaching epidemic proportions according to a new survey by employment law firm, Peninsula.

The survey of 2127 employees and 975 employers from a range of industries across the UK shows that employees are finding it easier to make up excuses to skip work.

In 1998 only 63% of employers said they had found an increase in uncertified absences, while six years on a huge 85% admitted to the problem.

The findings come as no surprise with almost all respondents, 91% admitting that they made up excuses to escape work.

Attempts to combat growing absenteeism, however, had been put into place by 74% of survey respondents up from just under half at 47% in 1998.

Peninsula, managing director Peter Done commented: “The priority for employers is to be aware that this problem is milking their business and hundreds of businesses around the country millions of pounds.

“It is not a problem which can be solved overnight. It is a problem which has to be implemented over time with both strict policies for absence and disciplinary procedures for those who have a running tendency to be absent through skiving.”

The law firm recommends implementing a disciplinary procedure which challenges employee’s reasoning for absence. In a warning, however, they say that any new procedures should be introduced ‘delicately’. The aim it says should be to eliminate ‘skivers’ rather than catch workers out, which might damage motivation levels.

The findings highlight latest absence concerns at Royal Mail and British Airways.

See our Editor’s Comment: Working the reward schemes to find out more.

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Annie Hayes

Editor

Read more from Annie Hayes
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