Author Profile Picture

Sylvie Ysambert

Talentia Software

Chief Marketing and Communications Officer

Read more about Sylvie Ysambert

Are conflicting local challenges preventing global HR integration?

vladnikon

As global growth opportunities arise, it comes as no surprise that many businesses are pursuing expansion in order to further their reach and enter new markets. This can often lead to problems in providing consistent and standardised policies companywide, however, due to difficulties in integrating global models that take into account regional processes and values.

When it comes to HR, it is commonplace for global businesses to implement a shared services model which can provide cost effectiveness and consistent delivery on a worldwide scale.

Unfortunately, this model frequently fails to take into account local nuances and conflicting challenges that come from operating in multiple markets.

As a result, HR departments are increasingly looking to strike a balance between utilising global systems and ones that can be adapted to suit a local set-up.

Adapting global processes to regional markets

A company-wide HR strategy is essential in order to align and engage the workforce.

At the same time, localised teams must be provided with the flexibility to adapt to regional practices and cultural norms in order for them to effectively recruit, train and develop people locally.

This strategy epitomises the rise of a glocal approach to HR management, one which forward-thinking businesses are beginning to adopt in order to maintain competitiveness in the global talent war and overcome challenges of working in an international market.

It also ensures that C-suite executives have a complete overview of their workforce in a central system, while avoiding complications when gathering information from various markets.

The concept of a team as we know it is rapidly changing, and an increasingly flexible approach to career management is emerging.

Flexibility to adhere to local processes

Employees should feel they are being treated fairly and the right processes are in place to support them, but also that individual considerations are taken into account for policies involving annual leave, salary, maternity pay, absence and training.

A glocal approach to HR incorporates processes that understand employees’ needs dependent on location as opposed to applying a one-size fits all model. Absence due to illness, for example, is an issue that varies in different regions across the world.

A glocal approach provides the necessary co-ordination between systems to help identify talent in other departments.

HR systems must therefore reflect cultural differences, whilst also being part of a wider operating model.

Working across borders to plug the skills gap

Companies often face significant skill shortages, varying according to particular regions of the world.

A glocal approach provides the necessary co-ordination between systems to help identify talent in other departments or locations within the company to help fill the gap.

Employees should feel they are being treated fairly and the right processes are in place to support them.

This approach ensures a shared culture philosophy while boosting career opportunities within the company. 

Businesses are also able to take full advantage of advancements in communication technologies, allowing global teams to work together in real time.

This has eased the need for employees to physically move from location to location, resulting in new lower-cost forms of meeting international experience demands and skills shortages.

The concept of a team as we know it is rapidly changing, and an increasingly flexible approach to career management is emerging.

Ultimately, the glocal approach can be achieved by any large business through striking a careful balance between the use of central yet flexible systems which promote global company values while ensuring regional and cultural requirements are nurtured.

This will not only help to drive global business expansion but ensure efficiency and agility. As more companies go global, it is more important than ever to think local.

Author Profile Picture
Sylvie Ysambert

Chief Marketing and Communications Officer

Read more from Sylvie Ysambert
Newsletter

Get the latest from HRZone

Subscribe to expert insights on how to create a better workplace for both your business and its people.

 

Thank you.

Processing...
Thank you! Your subscription has been confirmed. You'll hear from us soon.
ErrorHere