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Cath Everett

Sift Media

Freelance journalist and former editor of HRZone

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News: Men who wear pink shirts earn more and are better qualified

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Men who wear pink cotton shirts earn more and are better qualified than those who prefer traditional colours such as white or blue, according to a study.
 
On average, pink-loving males earn £1,000 more a year than those who prefer blue shirts and are twice as likely to have a Masters degree than those who favour white ones. One in 10 even has a PhD. 
 
But for those trying to get a promotion, purple should be the colour of choice.
 
Stephanie Thiers-Ratcliffe, international marketing manager for Cotton USA, said, which sponsored the survey, said: “You can tell a lot about someone by the colour they wear. Pink is a colour more men have been embracing recently and it’s encouraging that they are not afraid to experiment with brighter colours.”
 
But the poll of 1,500 male office workers undertaken by One Poll also revealed that males who wore pink also appeared more confident and were more likely to get compliments from female colleagues. In fact, a quarter of those questioned said that they felt more attractive when they donned a pink shirt.
 

Fans of green shirts, meanwhile, were the most likely to be consistently late for work, while those preferring white ones were the most punctual. 

4 Responses

  1. The only way is pink?

    It’s absolutely true that (a) relatively small numbers are involved and (b) just because the research shows this, it does not mean that donning a pink shirt (or tutu) will bring success.

    If that were true, we’d all be wearing Richard Branson beards.

    That said, it’s interesting in its own right and we should not analyse it too much.

    Mind you I’m wearing my pink shorts to Marlow today …

  2. News: Men who wear pink shirts earn more and are better qualifie

    So what does that prove? Perhaps that men who earn more and are better qualified dare to be less conventional in their choice of colours…. rather than ‘now get yourself a pink shirt – it’ll enhance your career’. Someone should have asked those pink-wearing guys whether they’ve always worn pink, or only after they gained a master’s degree and got a rise in salary…

    Dodgy ‘research’, if you ask me…  🙂

  3. Pink, Pink Floyd and The Pink Fairies

    I used to often wear pink shirts to work and I also own a pink tutu for performance purposes.  I did in fact receive compliments for the shirts from women.  I also used to get a lot of odd questions from the men.

    Have a great break Cath

Author Profile Picture
Cath Everett

Freelance journalist and former editor of HRZone

Read more from Cath Everett
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